• EMDR Therapy

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a powerful form of psychotherapy that helps individuals overcome trauma, anxiety, depression, and other psychological issues. This therapy is based on the premise that negative experiences can get stuck in our brains and cause psychological distress. EMDR therapy helps to process these negative experiences so that they no longer have a negative impact on our lives.

    EMDR therapy was developed by psychologist Francine Shapiro in the 1980s. Shapiro discovered that moving her eyes back and forth rapidly while thinking about negative experiences reduced the intensity of her emotional response to those experiences. She then developed a structured approach to this technique and called it Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy.

    EMDR therapy involves eight phases of treatment, which are designed to help individuals process traumatic memories and other negative experiences. The first phase involves a thorough assessment of the individual’s history and symptoms. The therapist and the individual work together to identify specific targets for treatment, such as a traumatic event or a negative belief about oneself.

    In the second phase, the therapist helps the individual develop skills to manage emotional distress. This may involve relaxation techniques, mindfulness exercises, and other coping strategies.

    The third phase involves desensitization, where the therapist uses eye movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation to help the individual process the traumatic memory or negative experience. The individual is asked to recall the traumatic event while simultaneously focusing on the eye movements or other forms of stimulation.

    The fourth phase involves installing positive beliefs, where the therapist helps the individual develop a more positive belief about themselves to replace the negative belief that was associated with the traumatic memory or negative experience.

    The fifth phase involves closure, where the therapist helps the individual feel a sense of closure and completion after each session.

    The sixth phase involves re-evaluation, where the therapist and the individual review progress and identify any remaining targets for treatment.

    The seventh phase involves strengthening positive beliefs, where the therapist helps the individual continue to develop positive beliefs about themselves.

    The final phase involves developing a plan for maintaining progress and preventing relapse.

    EMDR therapy has been extensively researched and has been found to be effective in treating a wide range of psychological issues, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety disorders, depression, and phobias. EMDR therapy is also used to help individuals overcome performance anxiety, chronic pain, and addiction.

    One of the unique features of EMDR therapy is that it can produce rapid results. Unlike traditional talk therapy, which may take months or even years to produce results, EMDR therapy can produce significant improvements in just a few sessions.

    In conclusion, EMDR therapy is a highly effective form of psychotherapy that can help individuals overcome trauma, anxiety, depression, and other psychological issues. It is a structured approach that involves eight phases of treatment and can produce rapid results. If you are struggling with a psychological issue, consider talking to a therapist about whether EMDR therapy may be right for you.

    At Bay Mental Health, we have a trauma therapist who practices EMDR, Julie DeJesus. If you believe you are suffering from the effects of PTSD, anxiety, depression, or phobias, you could benefit from EMDR Therapy. Contact Julie today at 260.750.3543 to schedule your appointment. For the moment, Julie is private pay only and does not accept commercial insurance.